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Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto

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Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto create a savory bite-sized appetizer that is perfect for a get together or the holidays. Figs are stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped with prosciutto, broiled then drizzled with balsamic and honey to create a sweet, savory and creamy treat! 

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto on plate

GOAT CHEESE FIGS WRAPPED IN PROSCIUTTO

One of my all-time favorite fall & winter appetizers are these Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto. The savory-sweet combination with the figs and the goat cheese is to die for. I also love the balsamic vinegar and honey drizzled on top at the end of broiling them. 

As we approach the holiday season this is an appetizer you have to make. It is one that will impress your guests but won’t take you very long to prepare. You can also prepare these goat cheese figs in advance {up to 4 hours} and keep them in the fridge until you are ready to boil. The figs can be served warm or at room temperature making them a great party appetizer.

You might remember my Moroccan Chicken Thigh recipe. It is a wildly popular recipe on my site and for good reason. That recipe uses figs in the chicken dish similar to how you would use figs in a tangine. I love the savory, sweet combination figs bring to dishes. 

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto with fork

ARE FIGS GOOD FOR YOU

Dried figs are a healthy addition to your diet. They help to naturally increase potassium and are naturally high in dietary fibre.

WHAT ARE FIGS AND HOW DO YOU USE THEM

Dried figs and other dried fruits make the perfect addition to Moroccan style dishes. You will often find them in tagines, which have been part of the Moroccan culture for hundreds of years. They also pair really well with soft cheeses and sweet honey. 

Dried figs are a healthy addition to your diet. They help to naturally increase potassium and are naturally high in dietary fibre.

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto figs

WHAT CHEESE IS GOOD FOR FIGS?

I just adore figs and cheese together. There is something so satisfying about that sweet figs paired with a soft, creamy cheese. I especially love goat cheese but also enjoy blue cheese or brie. 

HOW TO CHOOSE FRESH FIGS

If you have ever bough figs you know that figs can be fragile and delicate. They also don’t last long when you store them so it is best to buy them when you are ready to eat them or use them in a recipe.

Select figs that are clean and dry, with smooth, unbroken skin. The fruit should be soft and yielding to the touch, but not mushy

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto with balsamic

HOW DO YOU MAKE GOAT CHEESE FIGS

Preheat your broiler on high. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.

Cut each fig in half lengthwise. Note: I like to leave the stem on as a handle but you’re welcome to cut that off as well.

Cut each slice of prosciutto in half lengthwise as well.

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto wrapped on plate Place 1/2-1 tsp of goat cheese (depending on the size of the fig) in the center of the fig.

Wrap the fig with half a slice of prosciutto and place it cut side up on the baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining figs.

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto with goat cheese

Drizzle the olive oil over the wrapped figs and sprinkle them with fresh thyme.

Broil just until warm— about 3 minutes. Note: Watch carefully. Don’t walk away— they can burn very quickly!

Top the figs with balsamic vinegar, honey & sea salt flakes (if using).

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Proscuitto with honey

OTHER APPETIZER RECIPES TO TRY

GOAT CHEESE DIP

LEMON SPINACH ARTICHOKE DIP

LEMON MARINATED OLIVES

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto on plate

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto

Yield: 12
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes

Goat Cheese Figs Wrapped in Prosciutto create a savory bite-sized appetizer that is perfect for a get together or the holidays. Figs are stuffed with goat cheese and wrapped with prosciutto and broiled to create a creamy but slightly crispy treat! 

Ingredients

  • 12 figs
  • 4 ounces of goat cheese, at room temperature
  • 4 ounces of prosciutto, sliced paper thin
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves, chopped
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar or balsamic glaze
  • 1 teaspoon Sea Salt Flakes, optional
  • Optional: Honey for drizzling

Instructions

    1. Preheat your broiler on high. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
    2. Cut each fig in half lengthwise. Note: I like to leave the stem on as a handle but you’re welcome to cut that off as well.
    3. Cut each slice of prosciutto in half lengthwise as well.
      Place 1/2-1 tsp of goat cheese (depending on the size of the fig) in the center of the fig.
    4. Wrap the fig with half a slice of prosciutto and place it cut side up on the baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining figs.
    5. Drizzle the olive oil over the wrapped figs and sprinkle them with fresh thyme.
    6. Broil just until warm— about 3 minutes. Note: Watch carefully. Don’t walk away— they can burn very quickly!
    7. Top the figs with balsamic vinegar, honey & sea salt flakes (if using).
    8. These figs can be served warm or at room temperature. They can also be made in advance (up to 4 hours) and kept in the fridge until ready to broil.
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